SPINDRIFT THEATRE

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Anna, Eva, Henry and Julia of the London based contemporary theatre company Spindrift blog around their theatre making, researches and inspirations in both their life and the art world. Currently spanning from productions and influences from the art scene in London, New York, Iceland, Finland, Shetland and Norway, we hope to share honest findings, latest company news and our artistic progress with our tumblr audiences

 “‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe; All mimsy were the borogoves, And the mome raths outgrabe.
 “Beware the Jabberwock, my son! The jaws that bite, the claws that catch! Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun The frumious Bandersnatch!”
 He took his vorpal sword in hand: Long time the manxome foe he sought— So rested he by the Tumtum tree, And stood awhile in thought.
 And, as in uffish thought he stood, The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame, Came whiffling through the tulgey wood, And burbled as it came!
 One two! One two! And through and through The vorpal blade went snicker-snack! He left it dead, and with its head He went galumphing back.
 “And hast thou slain the Jabberwock? Come to my arms, my beamish boy! O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!” He chortled in his joy.
 ‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe; All mimsy were the borogoves, And the mome raths outgrabe.”- Lewis CarrollIs it fun because the nonsense leaves more space for our own imagination? Maybe the reason “the books are always better than the movie” is because you as the reader need to complete what’s missing with your own imagination. E.g. a character’s appearance, or the image of the world the writer is speaking of. In the Jabberwocky the rhythm and adventure draws you on, while the things you don’t understand gain a new personal/imaginative association. You don’t need to understand everything as you follow the beginning-middle-end of the adventure, and through your own imagination the details become yours. Theatre works from the same principle. It’s an encounter with the audience who have an active part in completing the world hinted by the performer, sound/set designer and director. The whole thing relies on this willingness to belief and submit to the performers in order to complete the piece. The moment we allow ourselves to forget our doubts and accept the circumstances we get to enter another world and be excited and entertained by the events. It’s easy, it’s fun, and its yours. But it’s a higher level of a shared experience than the book.One of the exciting things about working with Lewis Carroll’s life and work is the simple situations, quests and encounters that take place in his poems, and their openness. I get desperately excited in each new poem to become a part of the situation, and experiencing it in closeness, and long to invite others to make it their own experience as well. It’s not the sort of thing I want to watch from afar, I want to be in the book, and allow the audiences to take action and make decisions in their journey within our theatre piece. - Eva

“‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

“Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!”

He took his vorpal sword in hand:
Long time the manxome foe he sought—
So rested he by the Tumtum tree,
And stood awhile in thought.

And, as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
And burbled as it came!

One two! One two! And through and through
The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
He left it dead, and with its head
He went galumphing back.

“And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!”
He chortled in his joy.

‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.”
- Lewis Carroll

Is it fun because the nonsense leaves more space for our own imagination?

Maybe the reason “the books are always better than the movie” is because you as the reader need to complete what’s missing with your own imagination. E.g. a character’s appearance, or the image of the world the writer is speaking of.

In the Jabberwocky the rhythm and adventure draws you on, while the things you don’t understand gain a new personal/imaginative association. You don’t need to understand everything as you follow the beginning-middle-end of the adventure, and through your own imagination the details become yours.

Theatre works from the same principle. It’s an encounter with the audience who have an active part in completing the world hinted by the performer, sound/set designer and director. The whole thing relies on this willingness to belief and submitΒ to the performers in order to complete the piece. The moment we allow ourselves to forget our doubts and accept the circumstances we get to enter another world and be excited and entertained by the events. It’s easy, it’s fun, and its yours. But it’s a higher level of a shared experience than the book.

One of the exciting things about working with Lewis Carroll’s life and work is the simple situations, quests and encounters that take place in his poems, and their openness. I get desperately excited in each new poem to become a part of the situation, and experiencing it in closeness, and long to invite others to make it their own experience as well. It’s not the sort of thing I want to watch from afar, I want to be in the book, and allow the audiences to take action and make decisions in their journey within our theatre piece.

- Eva

— 1 year ago with 10 notes
#Lewis Carroll  #theatre  #inthemaking  #spinningon 
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